Peterborough Area

PeterboroughTop

April 23 2017 (Sunday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

A very small OFO group enjoyed a beautiful Spring day's birding in the Peterborough area on Sunday. A total of 64 species was recorded. Highlights included a total of 21 Ospreys seen; Greater White-fronted Goose on Kellogg Road in Welcome, near Port Hope; singing Vesper Sparrow; 3 Virginia Rails all seen at Sawer Creek; Eastern Bluebird, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Pine Warbler, 4 woodpecker species, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Common Raven. See ebird for lists for specific locations, as well as photos.

February 12 2017 (Sunday) Young Birders. Winter Birds of Peterborough and the Surrounding Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

Constant snow deterred parents from driving young birders to the meeting place in Peterborough on Feb. 12th. Only one participant was able to make it. Because of bad weather conditions, an abbreviated tour was conducted. A hike along the boardwalk at the John Pencier Trail, part of the Trent University trail system, resulted in the pishing in of a Winter Wren and the sighting of not one but two porcupine dens and the tracks leading to and from the home. Near Lock 25 on the Otonabee River, a 1st-year Bald Eagle perched above its carp breakfast. Close by were 3 Trumpeter Swans, a Herring Gull and many Common Goldeneyes. A flock of Robins fed in a buckthorn bush. Just below the lock, a male Kingfisher flew across the river.

January 1 2017 (Sunday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom, Matthew Tobey.

A beautiful January 1st day for those not suffering New Year's Eve partying resulted in an excellent day's birding in the Peterborough environs. 9 vehicles and 20 participants spent the morning in the Petroglyphs area and the afternoon in the Port Hope and Cobourg vicinity. 48 species were seen. Highlights : 2 male Wood Ducks on the Otonabee River, Pileated Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker (near Petroglyphs), 8 Evening Grosbeaks, 2 Northern Shrikes, a female Harlequin Duck in Port Hope Harbour, 2 Common Ravens, 2 Bald Eagles, Eastern Screech Owl, 4 Eastern Bluebirds, Snow Bunting, 10 Bohemian Waxwings, a Rusty Blackbird, Sharp-shinned and Cooper's hawks, and 10 Red-tailed Hawks .

January 24 2016 (Sunday) Peterborough - Young Birders

Leader: Dave Milsom.

The group of seven enjoyed a beautiful morning and snowy afternoon's birding at Petroglyphs Provincial Park, Stony Lake, Lake Katchewenooka, the Otonabee River north of Peterborough, Little Lake, and Northeys Bay Road. 35 SPECIES WERE FOUND. Highlights were 25 Red Crossbills in Petroglyphs, 35 Evening Grosbeaks, 60 Pine Siskins and 3 Purple Finch on Northey's Bay Road, 2 Northern Shrikes, Cooper's Hawk, 6 Red-breasted and 3 White -breasted Nuthatch, 3 Brown Creepers ( Petroglyphs), 2 Pileated Woodpeckers, 10 Ravens, a male Wood Duck with a Hooded Merganser and nearby Greater Scaup on the Otonabee River, and a total of 8 Bald Eagles : 2 adults and 2 first-year birds at Lock 25 on the Otonabee River, an adult at Lake Katchewenooka, and 2 adults and a first-year eagle at a carcass on Stony Lake.

January 1 2016 (Friday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

30 keen birders spent the day in the Peterborough and Petroglyphs areas with by far the most open water ever seen on this trip. This resulted in few birds on the Otonabee River but several surprises elsewhere, including a male Ring-necked Duck on Stony Lake and 3 Northern Shovelers on the Lakefield Lagoons. Altogether 8 waterfowl species were found in the group total of 41. On Highway 28 we found a group of 40 Bohemian Waxwings. At least 30 Evening Grosbeaks and 40 Pine Siskins were at a feeder on Northey's Bay Road. Up to 3 Red Crossbills were found in Petroglyphs Provincial Park along with Brown Creepers, both nuthatches and our 2nd Northern Shrike, which fed on a large dragonfly! Other good finds were Sharp-shinned Hawk, a 1st-year Bald Eagle over Stony Lake; a single Snow Bunting, Glaucous and Great Black-backed gulls near the Peterborough Landfill site; 6 Horned Larks on Scriven Road, 3 large flocks of Wild Turkeys; 4 Common Ravens; and at day's end 3 Eastern Screech and a Barred Owl in a woodlot just south of Peterborough.

April 5 2015 (Sunday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

Only 11 birders attended this Easter Sunday outing but were rewarded with some very good sightings. 61 species included several highlights : 5 Merlins : 4 at Young's Point including a mated pair sitting next to their nest; 4 Kestrels ; Osprey at Lakefield; one Bald Eagle on the nest at Lake Katchewenooka and one at Peterborough Dump; 4 Pied-billed Grebes; 16 waterfowl species including 22 Green-winged Teal in a pond near Bailieboro; 3 Greater White-fronted Geese ( 2 at Garden Hill, one at Grist Mill Pond); at least 32 Cackling Geese (31 at Garden Hill); Great Black-backed Gull (1st-year) on the Otonabee River near the Dump with a 1st-year Glaucous Gull; 3 Glaucous over the Dump; 2 adult Iceland Kumlien's close by; 2 Kumlein adults at Little Lake with a probable Nelson's Gull; Barn and many Tree swallows over the Otonabee River; 2 Eastern Phoebes, 3 Eastern Meadowlarks, 4 Kingfishers, 3 Pileated Woodpeckers, 5 Horned Larks, Common Raven, Wild Turkeys, and Common Redpolls. Many thanks to co-leaders Luke Berg and Matt Tobey for their excellent spotting and identification.

January 1 2015 (Thursday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

22 birders braved the cold, snow and wind to record a total of only 29 species on our annual OFO January 1st outing. Our best sightings were a Hoary Redpoll with a large flock of Common Redpolls at a feeder on Library Road off Northey's Bay Road near Petroglyphs Provincial Park. Nearby 2 more Redpoll flocks were seen, as well as a flock of over 30 Evening Grosbeaks. Other finds included 45 Wild Turkeys, 2 Bald Eagles, a 1st-year Iceland Gull, Greater Black-backed Gull, Snowy Owl (at Little Lake in Peterborough), both Nuthatches, and several Common Ravens. Many thanks to Martin Parker and Matthew Tobey for co-leading the tour.

April 6 2014 (Sunday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

20 birders enjoyed a beautiful Spring day's birding in the Peterborough and Cobourg areas today.

A group total of 79 species included several highlights

  • A Greater White-fronted Goose + 10 Cackling Geese at Garden Hill Pond north of Port Hope;
  • 7 Cackling Geese at Mather's Corners;
  • numerous ducks including Blue-winged Teal and Lesser Scaup on the Otonabee River north of Peterborough;
  • Bald Eagle on the nest north of Lakefield ( Young's Point Road);
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Northern Shrike, Eastern Meadowlark, Eastern Bluebird, Pileated Woodpecker, 4 Sandhill Cranes, 3 swan species, 10 species of raptor;
  • 5 gull species including Iceland and Lesser Black-backed.

Many thanks to co-leaders Luke Berg and Matthew Tobey for their great spotting.

February 8 2014 (Saturday) Young Birders' Outing

Leader: Dave Milsom.

The OFO Young Birders' group had a very successful outing today in the Peterborough and Cobourg areas.

49 species were found including 16 species of waterfowl and 6 species of gull.

Highlights included Coopers, Sharp-shinned hawks, Bald Eagle (1st-year), Pileated Woodpecker, White-winged Scoter; Trumpeter Swan & Green-winged Teal (Garden Hill Pond), Northern Shrike, Horned Grebe, 4 Red-necked Grebes (all on the Otonabee River), all 3 mergansers, Lesser Black-backed Gull 1st-year (Cobourg Harbour), Glaucous, Iceland gulls, Raven, American Robin, Cedar Waxwing, and 3 Ruffed Grouse (seen by one group).

January 1 2014 (Wednesday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

25 birders attended the Jan. 1st OFO outing around Peterborough today. Only 29 species were recorded. The cold weather had sent many species to find food at bird feeders.

On the Otonabee River between Trent University and Lakefield we saw Mallards, Common Goldeneyes, Common Mergansers, Long-tailed Duck, Red-necked Grebe and American Coot.

At Petroglyphs Provincial Park, workings of Black-backed Woodpeckers but no birds could be found. Sightings included Bald Eagle, Red-tailed Hawk, Common Raven, Brown Creeper, Hairy Woodpecker, Red-breasted Nuthatch and Golden-crowned Kinglets.

Also seen today were 2 Ruffed Grouse, 2 flocks of Wild Turkeys, 2 Snow Bunting flocks, Pileated Woodpecker, Cooper's Hawk, and several White-breasted Nuthatches.

January 1 2012 (Sunday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

12 birders attended the New Year’s Day OFO trip north of Peterborough today. The morning was mild and cloudy. The afternoon was a mix of rain and sleet.Only 25 species were recorded. Highlights were 5 Bald Eagles including 3 adults in the Lakefield area, Pileated Woodpecker, Ruffed Grouse, Snow Buntings, Evening Grosbeak, Golden-crowned Kinglet and both nuthatches. Waterfowl included Common and Hooded Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes and Black Ducks.The only waxwings seen were Cedar.

January 1 2011 (Saturday) Peterborough Area

Leader: Dave Milsom

Terrible weather conditions of incessant rain and thick fog did not deter 22 hardy birders from attending today’s OFO trip in the Peterborough area.

Despite the weather, there were some good sightings : 30 Bohemian Waxwings close to Lakefield College in Lakefield; 100 + Snow Buntings on a manured field near Stony Lake on County Road 6; 20 Evening Grosbeaks at the Drain house feeders on County Road 6; 2 flocks of Wild Turkeys; Coopers, Sharp-shinned and Red-tailed hawks, American Kestrel; Pileated, Hairy and Downy woodpeckers; Common Goldeneye and Common Mergansers on the Otonabee River south of Lakefield; American Tree, White‐throated and Song sparrows at feeders on Scollard Drive in Peterborough.

January 1 2010 (Friday) Peterborough

Leader: Dave Milsom.

Only 4 birders, James Smith (Dundas), Bill Logan (Cobourg), Maurice Sherman (Toronto) and myself attended the OFO New Year’s Day trip around Peterborough today.

We had snow most of the day but the roads were generally fine. Only 33 species were recorded but we found some “quality” species.

At Hall’s Glen on County Road 6 north of Lakefield were 56 Bohemian Waxwings. Just north of there at a feeder were 4 Evening Grosbeaks, 2 male, 2 female.

Along County Road 6 were 12 Northern Common Ravens. At Nephton a 1st‐year Golden Eagle flew overhead. We missed the Red Crossbills seen earlier in the day at Petroglyphs Provincial Park. but were satisfied with Black‐backed, Pileated, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, White and Red‐breasted Nuthatches, Golden‐crowned Kinglet and Brown Creeper.

Close to the Petroglyphs Park, a Barred Owl sat on the wires adjacent to the road. Near the highway, a 2nd‐year Bald Eagle was roosting in a Hemlock.

Along the Otonabee River near Lakefield were Common Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes, American Black Duck, Mallard and Canada Geese. We also saw 2 Sharp‐shinned Hawks, one at Lakefield and one at Young’s Point.

Animals included 2 Red Fox and a White‐tailed Deer.

January 1 2009 (Friday) Peterborough

Leader: Dave Milsom.

Only 4 birders, James Smith (Dundas), Bill Logan (Cobourg), Maurice Sherman (Toronto) and myself attended the OFO New Year’s Day trip around Peterborough today.

We had snow most of the day but the roads were generally fine. Only 33 species were recorded but we found some “quality” species.

At Hall’s Glen on County Road 6 north of Lakefield were 56 Bohemian Waxwings. Just north of there at a feeder were 4 Evening Grosbeaks, 2 male, 2 female.

Along County Road 6 were 12 Northern Common Ravens. At Nephton a 1st‐year Golden Eagle flew overhead. We missed the Red Crossbills seen earlier in the day at Petroglyphs Provincial Park. but were satisfied with Black‐backed, Pileated, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, White and Red‐breasted Nuthatches, Golden‐crowned Kinglet and Brown Creeper.

Close to the Petroglyphs Park, a Barred Owl sat on the wires adjacent to the road. Near the highway, a 2nd‐year Bald Eagle was roosting in a Hemlock.

Along the Otonabee River near Lakefield were Common Mergansers, Common Goldeneyes, American Black Duck, Mallard and Canada Geese. We also saw 2 Sharp‐shinned Hawks, one at Lakefield and one at Young’s Point.

Animals included 2 Red Fox and a White‐tailed Deer.

1 January 2008 Peterborough & Area

Leader: Dave Milsom.

8 brave birders met at the Zoo parking lot at 8:30 am and, despite the driving snow for most of the day, managed to find 29 species in the Peterborough area before the worsening weather brought the outing to a close at 3 pm. Best finds were 3 flocks of Snow Buntings, 28 Evening Grosbeaks (Country road 6 South of Petroglyphs), 21 Pine Grosbeaks (zoo area), a Hoary Redpoll amongst a flock of over 60 Common Redpolls on Division Road, Northern Shrike, Pileated Woodpecker, Sharp‐shinned Hawk and 21 Wild Turkeys. We were unable to find the Barred Owl on Division Road or the flock of Bohemian Waxwings seen yesterday near the airport. Many thanks to Jerry Ball for his expertise and leadership on this trip.

Reported by Dave Milsom.

1 January 2007 Peterborough and Area

Leaders: Dave Milsom, Gerry Ball.

Ten intrepid birders enjoyed the eight degree temperatures and drove the environs of Peterborough and Apsley today. Despite only recording 34 species, some good finds were made. Raptors included two Cooper’s Hawks, an adult Bald Eagle, a dark‐morph Rough‐legged Hawk, and three Red‐tailed Hawks. The group also saw three Common Ravens, a Northern Shrike, five Purple Finches (on highway #6 south of the Petroglyphs), a Red Crossbill and twelve Pine Siskins (on Jack Lake Road, Apsley). Also on highway #6, we had a flock of about forty Cedar Waxwings including five Bohemian Waxwings. All were feeding on juniper berries. A Belted Kingfisher was seen on the Otonabee River near Trent University.

Reported by Dave Milsom.

1 January 2006 Peterborough and Area

Leader: Gerry Ball. Thirteen birders traversed the snowy roads north of Peterborough today in only four vehicles (good car‐pooling !) and found less than 30 species but some interesting ones.

Best find was a Gray Jay at a feeder at #945 Road 504, east of Apsley. On Jack Lake Road in Apsley, we could not locate the Pine Grosbeaks seen Friday but did discover a flock of Evening Grosbeaks and a group of Common Redpolls, both visiting feeders.

On Sandy Lake Road, two Bald Eagles and several Common Ravens were seen. A single Snow Bunting north of Apsley, five American American Robins, a Belted Kingfisher on the Otonabee River, and an adult Northern Goshawk on Division Road, were other good sightings. Waterbirds included many Common Goldeneye, two Mute Swans, and several Common Mergansers. We could not relocate the flock of 140 Bohemian Waxwings seen yesterday at the Indian River on Division Road.

Many thanks to Jerry Ball for his expert leadership on this trip.

Reported by Dave Milsom.

9 January 2005 Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Leader: Dave Milsom.

A successful outing today for the 21 birders present. 11 Pine Grosbeaks on Northey Road prior to our fairly unproductive walk into Petroglyphs Park, where Bald Eagle, six Red-breasted and one White-breasted Nuthatch, 2 Hairy Woodpeckers, Golden-crowned Kinglet, three Rock Pigeons were all of note.

On our drive along County Road 6 to Lakefield, we found a Great Gray Owl near Stoney Lake, 15 Evening Grosbeaks, two groups of Redpolls, a Northern Shrike and a flock of Snow Buntings.

After a coffee stop in Lakefield, a mixed flock of 50 Bohemian and Cedar Waxwings were well seen at Bridge Street and Caroline near the Otonabee River. Several birders then headed south to Port Hope and were successful in seeing the Northern Hawk Owl. The rest birded Division Road and County Road 4 back to Peterborough through Duoro. A Pileated Woodpecker, 50 Bohemian Waxwings, and five Great Gray Owls were the highlights.

Reported by Dave Milsom

Broad-winged Hawk
Nestlings
Photo: Rick Lauzon

Red-tailed Hawk
Juvenile
Photo: Homer Caliwag

Rough-legged Hawk
Photo: Sandra and Frank Horvath

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Photo: Carol Horner

Northern Hawk Owl
Photo: Brandon Holden

Northern Goshawk
Juvenile
Photo: Jody Melanson

Red-tailed Hawk
Juvenile
Photo: Sam Barone

Petroglyphs Provincial ParkTop

11 January 2004 Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Leader: Geoff Carpentier.

Sixteen OFO members attended the outing to Petroglyphs and were treated to great weather, and fine company .. but sadly almost no birds. The woods were surprisingly lifeless. Not a squirrel or rabbit could be found. In fact on the four km hike we saw one Ruffed Grouse [well actually only two observers got it] and heard one chickadee!!!! At the entrance to the park we did find Evening Grosbeak, Raven, Pileated Woodpecker and Red-breasted Nuthatch with several more chickadees.

We spent our time learning about the culture of the native community, why the turtle is the logo for the park, what types of trees are there and how to tell a dog track from a wolf track ... we did see tracks of the latter, as well as coyote, snowshoe hare, deer, red squirrel and possibly fisher tracks!

We continued on to the ridge on the Unimin Mine property. Sadly, we went to our viewing area and were treated to increasing winds, plummeting temperatures, wind chill and four ravens. For the first time since the walk began in the 80's we did not see an eagle!

Reported by Geoff Carpentier

12 January 2003 Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Leader: Geoff Carpentier:

Eleven birders hiked Petroglyphs Park and environs to search for winter birds. Pickings were a little slim, but all of us enjoyed the marvelous weather (well, at least until the blizzard hit and we couldn't see our shoes!). Purple Finch, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Ruffed Grouse, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Hairy Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Pileated Woodpecker, and Common Raven were seen well and in good numbers. Oh yeah! we had killer looks at two Bald Eagles - one of them on a kill right beside the road. One was a second winter and one a first winter bird.

Thanks to the owners of the Unimin Mine who continue to give us access to the "ridge" so we can see these birds.

Reported by Geoff Carpentier

13 January 2002 Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Leader: Geoff Carpentier:

Seventeen OFO members visited the Petroglyphs Provincial park and environs. The park was somewhat quiet but the weather was pleasant and snow cover minimal. Highlights included: Common Raven, Ruffed Grouse, Pine Siskin, Evening Grosbeak, and Barred Owl. There were lots of signs that Black-backed Woodpeckers were about, but we couldn't actually find a bird - hmpffff! From here, thanks to the kind cooperation of Unimin Corporation, we visited their private landfill on the "Ridge" and were treated to killer ... in your face .... why do I do this stuff? ..... winds and a wind chill of minus a lot!!- and two Bald Eagles - one adult and one juvenile (probably 2nd year).

Other birds seen on the way home included Pileated Woodpecker, Snow Buntings and two Northern Shrikes. The latter are significant as they are scarce this year.

Reported by Geoff Carpentier

14 January 2001 Petroglyphs Provincial Park

Led by Geoff Carpentier.

Twenty-four birders traveled to Petroglyphs Provincial Park, north of Peterborough, to enjoy the first OFO outing of the millennium. And they were not disappointed!

Not only was the weather spectacular, but the birding was equally great. Temperatures hovered around freezing as the arriving birders stopped by the road to watch a first year and an adult Bald Eagle perched on a tree near a carcass and blind being used by a Canadian Geographic photographer. We walked the three kilometers through the park and were treated to many small flocks of Golden-crowned Kinglets, Brown Creepers, Black-capped Chickadees and both nuthatches. Interspersed were small flocks of mixed American Goldfinches and Pine Siskins, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers and the ubiquitous Blue Jay and one Red-tailed Hawk eating a Ruffed Grouse. Overhead, White-winged Crossbills and Common Ravens sang and chortled the advent of spring [maybe I'm too optimistic!?!]. We did have “killer” looks at a three White-winged Crossbills as they sat in a Hemlock tree above us and sang. Throughout the woods, Ruffed Grouse seemed very abundant, as did White-tailed Deer. All in all, this was a most enjoyable walk!

But we're not quite done - near the end of the walk, we saw three Bald Eagles sitting in a tree - two adult and one sub-adult! From here we went to the ridge, where Unimin Mines once again allowed us access to their private property and even plowed the road to the observation area for us. Our sincerest thanks go out to Scott Robinson and the rest of the Unimin staff for their continued co-operation. We didn't stay long on the ridge because it was quite foggy and visibility was limited and we had already been fortunate to see eagles "up close and personal" !! By the way, Tim Dyson, a local birder and raptor specialist, has been co-operating with the mine staff and Ministry of Natural Resources and is placing beaver carcasses out for the eagles in the park and mine area. This greatly enhances the chances of seeing the birds.

As a last minute bonus, Bob and Maxine Prentice advised that they had seen a Great Gray Owl nearby that morning, so off we went and yes, we were successful. Due to the amount of brown in the bird, it appears that it was an older individual. It looked healthy and alert as it sat beside the road. As we watched it, a Northern Shrike and an American Goldfinch put on an amazing cat and mouse act for several seconds - not sure who won as they finally disappeared behind some distant trees.

Reported by Geoff Carpentier

White-winged Crossbill
Photo: Sam Barone

White-winged Crossbill
Female
Photo: Mark Peck

White-winged Crossbill
Photo: Sam Barone

Red Crossbill
Photo: John Millman

Presqu‘ile Provincial ParkTop

September 10 2017 (Sunday) Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

About 30 people enjoyed a brilliant fall day birding Presqu'ile Park. As Ian Shanahan was under the weather I filled in as leader with assistance from Ron Tozer and Bill Gilmour, as well as lots of spotting help from the entire group. In some ways it was a quieter day than we have been experiencing over the past week with no big flocks or concentrations, but we still managed 84 species between 8 a.m. and 130 p.m. We started at the Lighthouse which was dead, but got better as we birded along Paxton Drive, then we made a stop at Calf Pasture area and then on the Beach birding between Beach 1 and 3. We concluded just outside the park gate at 240 Presqu?ile Parkway (the former mini putt golf course) for some hawk watching and lunch. We had some close up shorebird flocks that included 2 adult White-rumped Sandpipers mixed in with the Semis, Leasts, Semi Plovers, Sanderlings, patches of warblers totalling 15 species including an early Orange-crowned spotted by one lucky observer as well as Wilson's, Cape May, Bay-breasted, Pine, Black-throated Blue and Green, Parula, etc. Ducks were not well represented but did include a female Pintail with Canada Geese and a tight flock of 20 White-winged Scoters far out in Popham Bay. With mild north winds we managed a bit of a hawk flight passing over the gate area which included Bald Eagle, Harrier, Sharp-shinned and Cooper's, Red-tailed, American Kestrel and a Peregrine. Other notable finds included a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, several Philadelphia and a Blue-headed Vireo, a Raven, about 30 Horned Grebe far out in Popham Bay, and four flycatchers including Yellow-bellied.

June 3 2017 (Saturday) Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Dave Milsom.

Despite the fact that Presqu'ile Provincial Park was officially closed, our small group of 5 birders enjoyed the beautiful weather and 88 bird species today. At the residential area of the park, we found a few warblers including Black-throated Green, Blackburnian and American Redstart. Several Orchard Orioles were viewed . Other highlights included both Cuckoo species, Great Egret, Merlin, Caspian, Forster's and Common terns, Great Black-backed Gull, 7 shorebird species :Spotted Sandpiper, Killdeer, Sanderling, Black-bellied Plover, Dunlin, Ruddy Turnstone and a late Greater Yellowlegs near Garden Hill. On Trent Valley Road we had great looks at Vesper, Grasshopper and Field sparrows, plus Eastern Meadowlark. 5 species of swallow included a good number of Purple Martins at Presqu'ile. Many thanks to Doug McRae and Bill Gilmour for their generosity and willingness to invite us onto their property to view birds today.

November 27 2016 (Sunday) Cobourg Harbour, Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

About 25 birders enjoyed a unique combination of 53 species during today's OFO outing between Cobourg, Port Hope and Presqu'ile Provincial Park. How many times can an Ontarian say they saw an ibis, a warbler and a Snowy Owl in the same day? The weather couldn't have been better either, with above-zero temperatures, little wind and bouts of sunlight. *Cobourg Harbour* We dipped on the Harlequin Duck seen yesterday, but had solid looks at RED-THROATED LOONS off the pier. The nice collection of gulls and waterfowl in the harbour included female HOODED MERGANSERS, several COMMON MERGANSERS and a small group of aerobatic BONAPARTE'S GULLS. Some heard a GREATER YELLOWLEGS fly over around 8:30am. *A.K.Sculthorpe (Lake Street) Marsh, Port Hope* The juvenile GLOSSY IBIS found yesterday in Port Hope offered us greedy, walk-away looks at close range mid-morning. The intermittent sunlight illuminated the dull glossy green on its back, as well as the bright glossy green on the heads of nearby male MALLARDS. *Owen Point/Gull Island (Tombolo)/Sebastopol Island, Presqu'ile P.P.* With Gull Island attached to Owen Point (thus making it a tombolo), we enjoyed this rare chance for a wading-free circuit of Gull Island/Tombolo. All 3 species of swans fed in a group just east of tiny Sebastopol Island (formerly a tombolo). A female SNOWY OWL showed well on the small island itself, while a group of 11 SNOW BUNTINGS came and went. By far the highlight of this site, however, were the 3 PURPLE SANDPIPERS feeding at close range at northwest corner of Gull Island/Tombolo in beautiful direct sunlight. *Marsh across from the Camp Office, Presqu'ile P.P.* We made a quick stop at the Camp Office marsh lookout to enjoy the dabbling ducks, namely some dapper GREEN-WINGED TEAL. *Salt Point, Presqu'ile P.P.* 2 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS at close range here made it a 3-merganser day. A presumed BALD EAGLE soared distantly across the bay. A SONG SPARROW appeared in a small flurry of songbirds at the base of the point, above which a docile BELTED KINGFISHER sat in plain view. *Gilmour residence, Presqu'ile P.P.* We capped the day with great looks at an energetic YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER -- likely the same bird that has been seen at various locations along Bayshore Road in recent days. Many thanks to Richard Pope and Margaret Bain for their tips on birds in the Cobourg and Port Hope area; Maureen Riggs for her keen eyes and logistical support; and Bill Gilmour for his local insights and access to the family property. It might be difficult to top today's outing next year, but we're already looking forward to 2017!

September 11 2016 (Sunday) Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

Many waxwings usually means it has been a good day at Presqu'ile. That was the case at today's annual September OFO outing which produced a familiar narrative: excellent warbler movement, one or two notable shorebird species, high waterfowl diversity and solid representation across the spectrum of bird families expected at this time of year. The weather was also just downright gorgeous. The warbler species count totalled 17 for the group, and there were undoubtedly several more species about the Park. The thickest density was in the cedars beside the Park Store. Smaller flocks at the lighthouse area in the early morning and the Pines and Lakeside campgrounds in the early afternoon helped boost the list. Notables warblers from today included a single CANADA at the lighthouse, lone TENNESSEE at three different locations, two OVENBIRD near the lighthouse, several NORTHERN PARULA at two locations, a single BLACKBURNIAN at the lighthouse, two CAPE MAY near the Park Store, a lone WILSON'S at two locations, two BLACKPOLL near the Park Store and the rest of the "Eastern Black--- Five" warblers (not sure if that's a thing; we could make it a thing?). Two SCARLET TANAGERS feeding on Riverbank Grapes at the lighthouse were likely today's best non-warbler passerines, though some may lean more towards the RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET near the Park Store for that distinction. A streaky juvenile DARK-EYED JUNCO was likely from a local pair. Raptor diversity edged shorebirds eight to seven, and the low species count of the latter was in no small part affected by the high species (and individual count) of the former. MERLINS were common throughout, and appearances were also put in by AMERICAN KESTREL, NORTHERN HARRIER, the two 'small' accipiters and OSPREY. Some of these were sighted at the Shrew Solutions, Inc. property immediately north of the Park gate. The best shorebird was a juvenile RED KNOT feeding with a SANDERLING flock mixed with "peeps" off of Owen Point. A small flock of mainly LEAST SANDPIPERS at the base of the point also contained a BAIRD'S SANDPIPER. During one of the many raptor-induced disturbances at Owen Point, a PECTORAL SANDPIPER appeared amid the "piper" pandemonium. A typically high waterfowl species tally of 14 was aided by a distant BRANT off the south shore of Gull Island (visible from the High Bluff campground), two TRUMPETER SWANS off Owen Point and a solid, albeit skittish, collection of marsh and sewage lagoon frequenters at the Brighton Constructed Wetland and the adjacent Brighton Sewage Lagoons. Special thank-yous go out to Doug McRae for mid-day tips and access to his Shrew Solutions property, Bill Gilmour and Maureen Riggs for local tips and logistical support, and Keith Lee of the Municipality of Brighton for allowing group access to the Brighton Constructed Wetland.

September 13 2015 (Sunday) Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

No sun? No problem. A dedicated group of birders decided that the "bad weather brings good birds" sentiment made it worth the trip to Presqu'ile Provincial Park for the annual fall migration excursion. In truth, we were actually quite lucky with the weather as we avoided any deluges and were able to bird with little to no steady rain for most of the day. We even had 4 butterfly species, including a small movement of Monarchs. The biggest contributors to the impressive 102 species haul were the warblers. For the second straight morning, the Lighthouse area was a riot of passerines, with 21 warbler species seen by the group during 4 different circuits. In one of the most active and plentiful passerine flocks seen at Presqu'ile in recent memory were notables such as 1 late NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, many TENNESSEE WARBLERS, 1 CAPE MAY WARBLER, many NORTHERN PARULAS, several BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS, 1 (maybe 2) late YELLOW WARBLERS, several PINE WARBLERS, and at least 1 CANADA WARBLER. A GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH feeding on a mountain-ash with several SWAINSON'S THRUSH, a late GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER and 3-4 PHILADELPHIA VIREOS also showed well in the flock; several BARN SWALLOWS and SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS drifted overhead. Another impressive passerine flock near Owen Point yielded brief looks at an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER--warbler species # 22 for the day. Overall, multiples were seen of all common warbler species and there were likely many more flocks at other locations in the Park. The day just had that kind of feel to it... Shorebirds were respectable with 10 total species. All had excellent close-range looks at many SANDLERINGS, 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS (1 adult and 1 early juvenile), 2 juvenile RUDDY TURNSTONES, 1 juvenile BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, several LEAST SANDPIPERS and numerous "Semis" of both the plover and sandpiper variety. 2 WHIMBRELS were briefly seen on the eastern tip of Gull Island, albeit distantly as we scoped from Beach 3. 5 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 2-3 MARSH WRENS, several TREE SWALLOWS and both TEAL species were seen at the Brighton Constructed Wetland (BCW) in the early afternoon. The outing concluded at the Gilmour family cottage with a male NORTHERN HARRIER, 1 RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and several RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS. A special thank-you goes out to Keith Lee of the Municipality of Brighton for his hospitality at the BCW, Bill Gilmour for access to his backyard, Bruce DiLabio for some mid-day tips and the local Presqu'ile/Brighton birders for scouting before and during the excursion. It was an exhausting day keeping up with so many furiously active songbirds cascading through the trees amidst bouts of light rain, but it was well worth it.

May 10 2015 (Sunday) Presqu'ile and Peter's Woods

Leader: Doug McRae.

18 members and guests enjoyed a fun day of birding at Presqu'ile for the morning, then a side trip to Peter's Woods in the afternoon. Bill Gilmour helped me lead this field trip which tallied about 95 species. At Presqu'ile we had a pretty good selection of expected migrants and residents, although warblers (14 spp) were a little scarce and some were heard only. An increasingly rare treat was seeing a beautiful Red-headed Woodpecker at the lighthouse, as well as at least 5 Red-bellied Woodpeckers at various sites. Sadly Friday's Piping Plover hasn't been seen again but we did see 5 Semipalmated Plovers and a number of Least Sandpipers as well as Killdeer and Spotted Sandpiper. A morning haze made seeing birds on the offshore islands a bit difficult but we managed to spot a number of Black-crowned Night Herons as well as Common and Caspian Tern, Ring-billed, Herring and Bonaparte's Gull. Other fun birds were Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and Indigo Bunting. While I couldn't muster much excitement about it, a male House Sparrow was seen at a feeder near the lighthouse - a somewhat rare bird in the park! Peter's Woods is a beautiful old-growth forest north of Grafton. We took an hour to walk the loop trail and enjoy the huge pine, oak and maples and wildflowers. Birds were less active at this time of day but there were several Ovenbirds calling, as well as more Scarlet Tanagers.

November 9 2014 (Sunday) Cobourg Harbour, Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

The last-minute change to the weather forecast fell in our favour as a largely beautiful day served as a backdrop to the 4th annual Cobourg/Presqu'ile OFO excursion. 18 participants cumulatively amassed a respectable 53 bird species. Though no rare gulls or uncommon shorebirds put in appearances, it was an excellent early/mid-November day along the north shore of Lake Ontario. On the heals of a rare "peep sweep" during the September OFO outing at Presqu'ile at the height of shorebird season, today's group enjoyed the targeted "scoter sweep" with a single BLACK SCOTER off of Owen Point, Presqu'ile along with two SNOWY OWLS; 6 SURF SCOTERS showing well near Salt Point, Presqu'ile; and small numbers of WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS at various locations. Other waterfowl of note included 4 TUNDRA SWANS--vocalizing to boot--at Cobourg Harbour and 2 female HOODED MERGANSERS in the Presqu'ile marsh across from the Camp Office. A small group of DUNLIN with 6 SANDERLINGS and a single WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER fed at OWEN Point, while BONAPARTE'S GULLS came and went. From Owen Point, distant views of 1 ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK and a 1 COMMON RAVEN were had over the Northumberland hills to the north. The day ended at about 2:30pm with the darker northern abieticola race of RED-TAILED HAWK circling low over the Presqu'ile marsh. Other birds of interest included an adult male NORTHERN HARRIER near Chub Point, Grafton; immature COMMON LOONS off Wicklow Beach (1) and the Government Dock, Presqu'ile (2); and a BROWN CREEPER on the Owen Point Trail, Presqu'ile. In the six-legged realm, a small burst of warmth during a sunny period just after noon stirred up a lively Autumn Meadowhawk behind the Presqu'ile Park Store. Many thanks to those who took part in today's outing and lent a hand in scouting and spotting.

September 7 2014 (Sunday) Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

A record 65 participants enjoyed a consistently productive day at Presqu'ile Provincial Park and area. 86 bird species were collectively observed under near cloudless skies and a perfect 22*C.

A solid collection of songbirds greeted visitors at the Lighthouse area, with the best birds being an incessantly calling YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER as well as BLACKPOLL, WILSON'S AND BAY-BREASTED WARBLERS. A SCARLET TANAGER showed fairly well, as did fly-by OSPREY and AMERICAN KESTREL.

In an attempt to beat the heat haze, the group next ventured to Owen Point where an immature dark morph POMARINE JAEGER was briefly seen by 2 observers flying west over Gull Island. MERLINS and SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS were afoot, meaning the shorebirds in the area were skittish. Fortunately, good views were had at 2 WESTERN SANDPIPERS (one exhibiting no rufous colouring on the scapulars and the other showing plenty) amidst frequent group flights. Many SEMIPALMATED, some BAIRD'S and LEAST and 1 adult WHITE-RUMPED made for a rare "peep sweep". Pairs of SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS fed at close range in excellent light. Farther north, some observers enjoyed close-range views of a juvenile STILT SANDPIPER. An adult BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER roosted in the Beach 3 area near an adult GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL.

An immature BALD EAGLE soared high overhead just before lunch and a second immature was seen catching a fish off of Calf Pasture Point just after lunch. One of the best birds of the day was a juvenile DARK-EYED JUNCO--quite likely from a rare resident pair--that fed at close range at Calf Pasture.

Briefly stopping at the first viewing deck on the Marsh Boardwalk proved fruitful as a targeted NORTHERN HARRIER was seen immediately.

The day ended with a stop at the Brighton Constructed Wetland (BCW). As has been the case for much of the past 3 weeks, the north cell was very productive, with highlights including SOLITARY SANDPIPERS, WILSON'S SNIPE, another Short-billed Dowitcher and many LESSER YELLOWLEGS. In total, all observers tallied 16 shorebird species on the day.

The sunny weather made for excellent insect diversity for the time of year, as 14 butterfly species were seen, including hundreds of migrating Monarchs. The extensive dragonfly flight attracted the attention of Merlins and Kestrels all day.

Perhaps the most significant sightings of the day were 2 Northern Map Turtles at the Calf Pasture Lagoon just after lunch. This species at risk is exceedingly rare at Presqu'ile and had hitherto been unseen in the Park by the report writer.

Many thanks goes to the contingent of Brighton-area birders who always lend a hand on this outing, as well as the many others who offered their scopes to accommodate a large and keen group. A special thanks goes to Keith Lee from the Municipality of Brighton who went above-and-beyond the call of duty at BCW. Finally, Presqu'ile Park staff are to be commended for a first-rate job on preparing the viewing stations along the Owen Point Trail for shorebird season.

May 11 2014 (Sunday) Presqu'ile and Peter's Woods

Leader: Doug McRae.

Fourteen people enjoyed a great day in the field at Presqu?ile (morning) and Peter?s Woods (afternoon). The bright sun, heat and a bit of wind kept song and activity down a little but we managed to find 84 species, including a few goodies and lots of quality looks at quality birds. We also didn?t put much effort into marsh birds and ducks so that suppressed out total a bit too.

At Presqu?ile highlights included 3 breeding plumage Red-throated Loons off the beach, 25 + Great Egrets on nests, 2 Sandhill Cranes that did a flyby of Owen Point, 1 first summer Glaucous Gull on Gull Island, a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher pair building a nest - possibly to replace one built on a moving, hanging branch last week, 1 American Pipit, a nice selection of warblers including scope views of a preening Blackburnian and an Orange-crowned which is a rare spring migrant, several Scarlet Tanagers including an orange variant at the Lighthouse, a Rusty Blackbird there, and 8 Orchard Orioles among the many Baltimores.

Peter?s Woods was fairly quiet by mid day but we added a few species including Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, plus Red-tailed Hawk and Turkey Vulture in the area. The massive trees and wildflower/fern show was pretty nice as well.

March 29 2014 (Saturday) Young Birders Outing

Leader: Peter Burke, Doug McRae, Bill Gilmour.

17 young birders, aged 9 to 17 and their parents ventured to Presqu'ile PP today. Led by Peter Burke, Doug McRae and Bill Gilmour we had good views by scope of a good variety of ducks in the bay with the highlight being the Barrows x Common Goldeneye and 4 wood ducks. Early spring migrants were active including singing song sparrows and a meadowlark.

The afternoon was spend learning about eBird and sources of information on the Internet. Peter led a drawing workshop and Doug treated us to a demonstration of skinning and preparing bird skins for scientific study.

November 10 2013 (Sunday) Cobourg Harbour, Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Leader: Ian Shanahan.

25 participants enjoyed an enjoyable, albeit windy (!), day birding at Cobourg Harbour, Chubs Point and Presqu'ile Provincial Park where a seasonally productive 42 bird species were encountered.

A COMMON LOON at extremely close range greeted the group first-thing in the morning at Cobourg Harbour. RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, NORTHERN SHOVELER and AMERICAN WIGEON were some of the more notable ducks seen in the harbour, along with a lone BONAPARTE'S GULL and a skittish group of 5 DUNLIN.

Chubs Point south from the Grafton exit on the 401 was exceedingly windy and thus warranted a short visit. Regardless, wave-bouncing SURF and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were observed.

The highlight of the day was the SNOW GOOSE at Presqu'ile's Beach 2 that has been present for several days. A barely-alive Giant Water Bug feeding on a dead LONG-TAILED DUCK on the beach marked the most interesting find of the day! It was one of two moribund insects seen -- the other being a Monarch near the Lighthouse.

The shelter of Bayshore Road allowed for steadier views of both previously seen scoters, a HORNED GREBE, REDHEADS and GREATER SCAUP in Brighton Bay.

The resident RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER at 186 Bayshore Road made for a good finale.

Many thanks go to Maureen Riggs for her pre-scouting, Doug McRae for his tip on the Snow Goose and the Helleiner and Gilmour families for generously allowing group members to bird on their properties.

September 11 2011 (Sunday) Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

A string of recent summer weather likely contributed to the unusually low species count of 63 birds for our group of about 25 birders at Presqu’ile today, but the lack of quantity was compensated for by quality looks and quality sightings. The EARED GREBE that has been visible off of Owen Point for several days offered distant views at mid‐morning and a juvenile LONG‐BILLED DOWITCHER appeared at Owen Point shortly after a juvenile SHORT‐BILLED DOWITCHER flew in with 4 BLACK‐BELLIED PLOVERS just prior to lunch. Other notable shorebirds of our 13 species for the day include one juvenile DUNLIN, 2 juvenile RUDDY TURNSTONES, 2 juvenile LEAST SANDPIPERS, 6 molting adult WHITE‐RUMPED SANDPIPERS and 15 SANDERLINGS. All shorebirds were seen at close range and in good light amidst appearances by a MERLIN, a PEREGRINE FALCON and a juvenile NORTHERN HARRIER.

Other raptors of note include a kettle of 10 TURKEY VULTURES above the Owen Point Trail parking lot mid‐afternoon as well as 2 COOPER'S HAWKS and a SHARP‐SHINNED HAWK at our beginning location around the Lighthouse Interpretive Centre. It was inititally thought that the presence of the two smaller accipiters around the lighthouse resulted in low songbird numbers there, but songbirds were challenging to find throughout the park all day.

A brief early afternoon visit to the second tower of the Marsh Boardwalk afforded excellent views at 30 WOOD DUCKS and then a surprise fly‐by from a dark Ibis that is almost assuredly the WHITE‐FACED IBIS that has been seen recently in the park (including on Gull Island by others this morning) became the highlight of the day.

Other notables from the day include a singing WARBLING VIREO and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, vocalizing Gray Treefrogs, Spring Peepers and 1 Northern Leopard Frog, 11 butterfly species (including a Common Buckeye at Lookout #1 on the Owen Point Trail) and many swarms of Black Saddlebags and darners.

September 12 2010 (Sunday) Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

The annual Presqu’ile OFO trip led by myself and my dad, Don Shanahan, is once again in the books and with many sightings of note to report.

Though the weather looked ominous to start the day as we set out in search of songbirds around the Lighthouse area, little more than occasional periods of thin drizzle in the morning were encountered. A MERLIN perched in plain view near Presqu’ile Weekly Birding Report writer Fred Helleiner’s residence. Its presence, unfortunately, was surely the cause of unusually wariness of a songbird flock on Paxton Drive. Better success with songbirds was achieved at Calf Pasture as good views of a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT and both BLACKPOLL and at least three BAY‐breasted WARBLERS were enjoyed by all. A lingering adult CASPIAN TERN as well as a newly arrived immature COMMON LOON were seen off the shores of Calf Pasture in addition to several PIED‐BILLED GREBES. Three COOPER’S HAWKS also made a brief appearance.

As is almost always the case on this outing, shorebirds reigned supreme due to a productive visit to Owen Point. Quality looks at several SEMIPALMATED and LEAST SANDPIPERS, SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, SANDERLINGS and BAIRD’S SANDPIPERS, two PECTORAL SANDPIPERS and an adult DUNLIN right at Owen Point were combined with slightly more distant looks at RUDDY TURNSTONES and BLACK‐BELLIED PLOVERS (adult and juvenile birds). Two juvenile AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVERS also dashed by briefly as did a distant PEREGRINE FALCON over Gull Island. Ducks of note in the Gull Island area included GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON, BUFFLEHEAD, GREEN‐WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, GREATER SCAUP and REDHEAD. On the way to and from Owen Point, two small songbird flocks contained GOLDEN‐CROWNED KINGLETS, BLACK‐THROATED GREEN WARBLERS, MAGNOLIA WARBLERS and a WILSON’S WARBLER.

After lunch, the group visited the Gilmours’ cottage at 83 Bayshore Road and enjoyed some exceptional backyard birding involving looks at a BALTIMORE ORIOLE, three BROWN THRASHERS, two SWAINSON’s THRUSHES, a resident CAROLINA WREN, a group of newly‐arrived WHITE‐THROATED SPARROWS and several RUBY‐THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS. A songbird‐dispersing buzz by a SHARP‐SHINNED HAWK signalled our departure to our last stop at the Brighton Constructed Wetland.

At the wetland, many LESSER YELLOWLEGS, BONAPARTE’S GULLS and BLUE‐WINGED TEAL were seen as were three SORAS. Two or three MARSH WRENS and a single COMMON MOORHEN capped off the afternoon as did across‐the‐road looks at WOOD DUCKS and a HOODED MERGANSER. Non‐bird species of note included several Monarchs, two Eastern Tailed Blues, various darners and clusters of Fringed and Bottled Gentians.

The total bird species count was *Ninety‐four* (possibly a new high for this trip) as birding was steady all day. *Fourteen species of shorebirds* as well as *twelve species of warblers* greatly contributed to the high species diversity of the day.

My dad and I would like to extend a special thanks to the Gilmours for their incredible hospitality (and good birds) and Bill Gilmour, Maureen Riggs and the contingent of local birding friends for volunteering their time to lend extra eyes and ears all day. Good birding and see you next year!

13 September 2009 Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

Over thirty birders, old friends and new, gathered at the Presqu’ile lighthouse this morning for a good day of birding in beautiful late‐summer weather. Our first go‐round of the lighthouse was unproductive and songbirds proved to be challenging all day. However, the beach yielded twelve shorebird species and the number of water birds seen in various habitats continued to impress all day.

Probably our best shorebird, a Long‐billed Dowitcher, required two or three visits for everyone to get a good look. The dowitcher’s tertials received much scrutiny. American Golden and Black‐bellied Plovers were seen well in the same area and, at Owen Point, a number of Baird’s Sandpipers and a single White‐rumped Sandpiper offered good scope looks. A nice selection of rather nervous‐looking ducks patrolled the waters off Owen Point, as did two Horned Grebes.

A viewing lunch at the Gilmour’s produced four woodpecker species and, at various bird baths, Gray Catbirds, two Northern Parulas, a Common Yellowthroat and a Magnolia Warbler.

After leaving the park we visited the Brighton Water Polishing Ponds thanks to the generosity of Tiny Lee. Sora and Virginia Rails offered repeated, open‐water looks and both yellowlegs species as well as a pair of Stilt Sandpipers mingled with the Blue and Green‐winged Teal in the shallows. Above, a Sharp‐shinned Hawk was seen rising in a thermal and an Osprey “rode shotgun” on a passing immature Bald Eagle. Across the road, we saw Northern Shovelers, Wood Ducks, Hooded Mergansers and a couple of dozen Bonaparte’s Gulls.

Several group members had lifers, most had good looks at birds presenting identification challenges and everyone enjoyed the good companionship of the day. In total, the group saw 89 species. Many thanks for the help provided by my Presqu’ile friends, the hospitality of Bill and Margaret and Tiny Lee. Also, thanks to Terry for the check list.

7 September 2008 Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

A large, eager group started the day at the Presqu’ile lighthouse on a beautiful, late‐summer morning. A circulating songbird flock proved challenging to observe but did offer good looks at Northern Parulas, Blackpoll and Blackburnian Warblers. We eventually tallied 13 warbler species. A couple of Philadelphia Vireos stood out among four vireo species seen in the same cluster of willows. After a couple of circuits of the foliage‐rich lighthouse area, we headed for Owen Point where numerous shorebirds were visible at close range and offered great looks for those wanting to compare and contrast the various species. All five “peep“ species were seen with the last being a dandy juvenile Western Sandpiper seen in the rain on our second visit to the point. The latter bird was a lifer for several group members. Throughout, a single juvenile Red Knot foraged amidst a squadron of earth‐moving Ruddy Turnstones, while juvenile Black‐bellied and American Golden‐Plovers occasionally offered brief glimpses as they foraged on the gravel bar and Gull Island.

The rains came after lunch and made songbird viewing more difficult. All was forgotten, however, when we visited “Tiny“ Lee at the Brighton water polishing ponds where six new shorebird species waded in close proximity to one another and brought our shorebird total up to 20 species. Good comparisons were again available including the three Tringa species (the yellowlegs as well as Solitary Sandpipers) in a single field of view and two Stilt Sandpipers feeding nearby Lesser Yellowlegs and Short‐billed Dowitchers. Marsh Wrens were calling in the cattails and several group members saw both Virginia Rail and Sora, thus bringing our species total to 90.

We would like to thank all group members for their enthusiasm and perseverance, particularly when the rains came. We hope to see you all next year.

Reported by Don and Ian Shanahan

9 September 2007 Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

Threatening grey skies greeted the small group of birders who met at the Presqu’ile Lighthouse this morning. Initially action was good with nice looks at a singing Carolina Wren, glimpses at hummingbirds darting about jewel weed and quick looks at several warblers. Then the rain came and increased so that the group had to seek shelter beneath the front porch of the Lighthouse Interpretive Centre. While we waited, a Great Black‐backed Gull (now uncommon at Presqu’ile) was spotted off‐shore and a darting flock of warblers moved quickly through the lakeshore treeline. Then things slowed right down and it was hard to imagine that eventually warblers would win the species count fifteen to fourteen over shorebirds.

Most of the group travelled through the campgrounds to Chatterton Point where good numbers of shorebirds foraged at close range on the shaly shoreline. Good looks were had at various peeps and at Baird’s and White‐rumped Sandpipers, often in the same scope field of view. A warbler flock passing between us and the shorebirds contained a brightly coloured, portrait‐grade Red‐Breasted Nuthatch. Returning to the Lighthouse, we encountered a couple of Merlins that were harassing a crow and several Blue Jays. After lunch, with the rain persisting, we briefly picked up another warbler flock that contained a Northern Parula and a Bay‐breasted Warbler. A female Indigo Bunting flitted about a Dogwood bush with a couple of Nashville Warblers.

En route to Owen Point, we discovered several clusters of attractive Bottled Gentians. Besides a lot more rain, Owen Point offered several juvenile Black‐bellied Plovers, Semipalmated Plovers, a distant American Golden Plover and a Trumpeter Swan. A few Monarch Butterflies bounced around the area prior to their departure to the south. Again, wherever there was jewel weed there were zipping hummingbirds. After absorbing our quota of rainwater, the determined remnants of our group travelled out of the park to the Brighton water polishing ponds. These were made accessible thanks to the kindness of Keith Lee, manager of Brighton’s water treatment facilities.

A large dead tree next to the ponds was full of Cedar Waxwings and the ponds contained Lesser Yellowlegs, a Solitary Sandpiper and a colourful Short‐billed Dowitcher. Common Moorhens and a Marsh Wren sang in the cattails beside the ponds. Across the road in the sewage lagoons, we found good numbers of Wood Ducks, including a striking male, two female Common Goldeneyes and several Bonaparte’s Gulls. A Sora popped up in front of us to make a short flight along shoreline vegetation.

At wrap‐up time, our group had seen a hard‐earned eighty‐six species. Thanks to all who helped make this challenging day a success.

Reported by Don and Ian Shanahan.

10 September 2006 Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Over 40 well‐bundled‐up birders met at a chilly Presqu’ile Lighthouse. Warblers and Vireos were abundant but, possibly due to squadrons of Sharp‐shinned Hawks patrolling over the tree tops, remained nervous and very fast moving. It usually took a couple of tries to get a get a good look at any one species but eventually 14 were tallied. American Redstarts were abundant, several Northern Parulas highlighted morning sightings and the final warbler species seen was a Blackburnian. A couple of female Scarlet Tanagers were also spotted and zipping Ruby‐throated Hummingbirds were present near most patches of Jewel Weed.

Surprising for Presqu’ile, shorebirds were almost completely absent. The total number of shorebirds seen was exceeded by a single flock of American Pipits that flew past Owen Point. Three unexpected Whimbrels at least put a stamp of quality on the meagre shorebird list.

Some trip highlights included a young birder bagging several lifers, the astonishing antics of a very young Black Swallowtail (butterfly) and the presence of this trip’s youngest ever participant.

Thanks to everyone in the group who helped make the day so interesting.

Reported and led by Don and Ian Shanahan.

18 September 2005 Presqu‘ile Provincial Park, Fall migrants, shorebirds, hawks

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

A beautiful, late summer day unfolded for 34 birders at Presqu‘ile. The group began near the lighthouse where songbirds, and particularly, warblers, abounded. Most of the darting forms were Yellow-rumped Warblers; however, the circling flocks allowed most group members the opportunity to grab good looks at up to 12 warbler species. Highlights included a Northern Parula, a striking Black-throated Green Warbler and a Blackburnian Warbler. Near the warblers, a Philadelphia Vireo frequently foraged with a Red-eyed Vireo and a Scarlet Tanager or two could usually be found.

Though the beach and the marsh appeared to offer little throughout the afternoon, sharp-eyed group members continued to produce good birds. Two American Pipits were spotted on the beach and Redheads and both teal were located in Popham Bay. Later, a Great Egret, two American Bittern and a Common Moorhen were discovered amidst the marsh's thick cattail growth. Late-season shorebirding, not helped by marauding Merlins, offered mostly Sanderlings and Black-bellied Plovers with a smattering of peeps thrown in. Perhaps the day's most unique sighting was a large coyote on Gull Island which we observed as it decided how to avoid birders walking nearby. Among several dragonfly species seen were uncommonly high numbers of the normally uncommon Black Saddlebags.

Reported by Don and Ian Shanahan

7 September 2003 Presqu‘ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

A beautiful, late summer day greeted over 50 birders at Presqu‘ile today. A morning walk to Owen Point offered close-range looks at 12 shorebird species. Although marauding Merlins and Sharp-shinned Hawks kept the shorebirds on the move, most viewers saw individual species quite well. These included Baird's, White-rumped and Pectoral Sandpipers, Short-billed Dowitchers, Sanderlings and Red Knots. The latter were life birds for several group members and several more birders made good progress in sorting out the 'peeps'. Various dabbling ducks flocked about Gull Island and Caspian Terns and Bonaparte's Gulls flew frequently about the viewing area. The next stop included the Lighthouse and Paxton Drive where songbirds proved to be very elusive. This situation was probably made worse by the constant presence of soaring raptors. The group persisted, however, and eventually came up with ten species of warblers. Just before lunch the Gilmour garden yielded bathing Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, several abrasive Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and a manic Wilson's Warbler. Songbirds continued to be tough after lunch but a pair of Merlins compensated by putting on an exciting flight display over the Calf Pasture lagoon. Later, on the way back to Owen Point, a foraging male Northern Parula was well-seen by all. As usual, our second visit to Owen Point produced great looks at previously seen shorebirds and three new species including a poorly-seen Buff-breasted Sandpiper on Gull Island.

Throughout the group's travels good looks were had at 13 butterfly species. Also, a sphinx moth larva with pupation on its mind was seen tunneling into the earth by the side of Paxton Drive. The eight species of dragonflies seen featured three types of meadowhawks, several Black Saddlebags and an uncommon Rusty Snaketail. A very full day in the field produced 75 species of birds.

Reported by Don and Ian Shanahan Brighton

8 September 2002 Presqu‘ile Provincial Park

Leaders: Don and Ian Shanahan.

A large and enthusiastic group braved stifling temperatures while searching for various birds at Presqu‘ile today. A nice count of 15 shorebird species, mostly seen at close range, offered many informative studies of species that can be confusing. Most birds were juveniles and fresh specimens of Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers as well as Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers were seen side-by-side. Also present were good numbers of Pectoral Sandpipers and Sanderlings and several active Ruddy Turnstones. Many group members appreciated the chance to compare Baird's (juveniles) with White-rumped Sandpipers (adults). Much productive discussion followed these observations. An afternoon return to Owen Point turned up an immaculate Short-billed Dowitcher, again seen at very close range. Merlins were occasionally present but fortunately didn't scatter the shorebirds from the viewing areas. Gravel bars about Gull Island offered good numbers of both Common and Caspian Terns and Bonaparte's Gulls. The hoards of Mallards congregating about Gull Island also offered up American Black Ducks and Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal. Passerines were in short supply and, given the very hot conditions, those present showed little inclination to show themselves. As a result, coverage of several normally productive trails produced more anecdotes from group members than birds. An open area of the Presqu‘ile Marsh produced a Great Egret, several immature Wood Ducks and Common Moorhens and a soaring Northern Harrier.

Several dragonfly aficionados enhanced the group's experience by sharing their field knowledge of the challenging odonata group. As a result, everyone had good looks at Black Saddlebags and Yellow-legged Meadowhawks, dragonflies uncommon in the Presqu‘ile area. Amidst a mediocre season for butterflies, many Viceroys were seen along with both Crescents and several very fresh Question Marks.

Reported by Don and Ian Shanahan

9 September 2001 Presqu‘ile Provincial Park

Led by Don and Ian Shanahan.

Oppressively hot weather made birding extremely challenging today on the OFO Presqu‘ile Trip. Starting at beach four, the group had an introductory look at some "peeps" or small shorebirds and a handful of American Pipits.

En route to Owen Point several groups of agitated Black-capped Chickadees were seen, but, unfortunately, as was the case for most of the day, no warblers could be found with them. Owen Point offered good looks at a juvenile Red Knot, Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers, Baird's and Pectoral Sandpipers plus a worn adult White-rumped Sandpiper.

Close range studies allowed some group members to begin sorting out some of the smaller sandpipers. The reason for the general nervousness of all shorebirds was made clearer throughout the day by the appearances of a Merlin, an immature Northern Goshawk and a Peregrine Falcon. Ducks seen off Owen Point included Northern Pintails, American Wigeon and both kinds of teal. Later, an obliging quartet of immature Wood Ducks were seen in the Calf Pasture lagoon.

Despite much searching, few passerines could be found. Exceptions were provided by several Black and White Warblers, a male Cape May Warbler and a "green" Blackpoll Warbler. Very young Cedar Waxwings foraging in warbler territory provided a few puzzling moments.

One male Purple Finch was seen and, amazingly, no sparrows of any kind were observed.

Near the end of the day, the group had a close-up look at a flock of Red Admirals plus an Eastern Comma perched on a patch of goldenrod. An afternoon return to steaming Owen Point rewarded the group with a look at a juvenile Little Gull.

10 September 2000 Presqu‘ile Provincial Park

Led by Don Shanahan.

Members of OFO`s field trip to Presqu`ile were treated to the spectacle of a major shorebird staging area operating at full capacity. Hundreds of shorebirds fed, flocked and flew about Owen Point and nearby habitat rich Gull Island. Bonaparte`s Gulls mingled with the shorebirds and added to the cacophony of anxiously calling birds. Merlins and Sharp-shinned Hawks showed observers some of the perils faced in a "day in the life" of a shorebird. Fifteen of the eighteen shorebird species seen in the park on the weekend were seen by the group, usually at close range and in good light. Highlights were provided by side-by-side studies of both juveniles and adults of Black-bellied and American Golden Plovers. Juvenile Baird`s Sandpipers and adult White-rumped Sandpipers were frequently visible in the same field as numerous "peeps" and Sanderlings. Red Knots and Ruddy Turnstones regularly appeared and then were gone as they commuted to and from Gull Island. Caspian and Common Terns provided constant vocalizations and some amazing aeronautical stunts just off shore from the shorebird flocks.

Songbirds were less co-operative than the shorebirds; however, after covering many trails the group was able to find 14 warbler species, including Northern Parula, Bay-breasted, Yellow, and Blackburnian Warblers. En route to birding spots the group had good looks at a Red-bellied Snake, a Blue-spotted Salamander and the unique Bleeding Tooth Mushroom. As usual, a second look at the beach provided the last stop of the day. Back at Owen Point, many in the group took the opportunity to look at formerly problematic shorebirds, and most left with a greater appreciation for the lifestyles of these amazing nomads.

Reported by Don Shanahan

Red Knot
Photo: Mark Peck

Willet
Photo: Ken Newcombe

Long-billed Dowitcher
Photo: Harold Stiver

Sanderling
Photo: Mark Peck

Dunlin
Photo: Homer Caliwag

Sanderling
Basic
Photo: Brandon Holden

Spotted Sandpiper
First winter
Photo: Frank and Sandra Horvath

Short-billed Dowitcher
Photo: Jean Iron

Marbled Godwit
Photo: Mike Veltri

Red-necked Phalarope
Juvenile moulting to 1st basic?
Photo: Raymond Barlow

Whimbrel
Photo: Carol Horner

Greater Yellowlegs
Juvenile
Photo: Brandon Holden

Solitary Sandpiper
Photo: Sam Barone

Curlew Sandpiper
Photo: Carol Horner

Whimbrel
Photo: Sandra and Frank Horvath

Baird's Sandpiper
Photo: Brandon Holden

Long-billed Dowitcher
Juvenile
Photo: Tony Beck

White-rumped Sandpiper
Mostly adult White-rumped Sandpipers.
Photo: Jean Iron

Greater Yellowlegs
Photo: Jean Iron

Short-billed Dowitcher
Photo: John Millman

Red Phalarope
Photo: Barry Cherriere

Least Sandpiper
Basic
Photo: Mark Peck

Purple Sandpiper
Photo: Barry Cherriere

Wilson's Snipe
Photo: Sandra and Frank Horvath

Prince Edward Point
National Wildlife AreaTop

April 23 2017 (Sunday) Prince Edward County South Shore Important Bird Area

Leader: Mike Burrell.

I had the privilege of leading the now annual late April OFO trip to the Prince Edward County South Shore IBA yesterday. Migrant passerines were very slow but we still found about 90 species. The highlights of the day were two Little Gulls at the Kaiser Crossroad flooded field and many typical mid-April migrants including all three scoters, five species of swallows, nine species of sparrows and of course being about seven hours early for the Say's Phoebe at the bird observatory!

April 17 2016 (Sunday) Prince Edward County (Trip ends early afternoon)

Leader: Mike Burrell.

Twenty OFO members joined me for the now annual outing to the [Prince Edward County South Shore Important Bird and Biodiversity Area]( http://www.ibacanada.ca/site.jsp?siteID=ON003). To say the weather cooperated is certainly an understatement! Highlights of the 87 species observed were great looks at a Little Gull at Kaiser Crossroad flooded fields, a very early Chimney Swift at Prince Edward Point and a flock of at least 300 Bohemian Waxwings also at Prince Edward Point. Seeing and hearing many typical mid-April migrants was also a highlight for many of us. Here are links to the eBird checklists for the day [Kaiser Crossroad](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S29017409) [Long Point Road](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S29017568) [Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S29017982) [Point Petre](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S29018156)

April 19 2015 (Sunday) Prince Edward County (Trip ends early afternoon)

Leader: Mike Burrell.

About 25 birders joined me for the second annual spring OFO trip to various spots within the [Prince Edward County South Shore Important Bird Area](http://ibacanada.org/site.jsp?siteID=ON003&lang=EN). The weather was delightful although there was a very cool east wind at some locations. Birds were very thin in the wooded areas but we finished with a more than respectable 85 species for the day. Highlights were a good mix of ducks and typical mid-April landbirds including 10 species of sparrows, 4 species of swallows, Pine and Yellow-rumped Warblers and a single Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Special thanks goes to the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory for the use of their facilities, logistical support, and, most importantly, coffee. And of course everyone on the trip who made it a fun day and helped with spotting birds. Below is a list from each of our stops through the day: [Kaiser Cross Road](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S22955075) [Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S22955387) [Lighthall Road](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S22955552) [Point Petre](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S22955593) Please contact me privately for more specific information about any of the birds or locations we visited.

October 19 2014 (Sunday) Amherst and Wolfe Islands and Kingston Area

Leader: Mike Burrell.

15 birders joined me on a great day out in the Kingston area for the OFO outing to Amherst Island. On the island we visited the Martin Edwards Reserve and the Owl Woods and then on the mainland we visited the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons. It was a great day to be out with lots of birds everywhere we visited and a total of 88 species. Highlights included: - 1 "blue morph" Snow Goose flying over at the Martin Edwards Reserve (MER) - 1 Cackling Goose at Amherstview Sewage Lagoons - 1 Northern Goshawk seen by the whole group amongst a small raptor flight at MER - 1 Snowy Owl at MER (has been present all summer) - point blank views of a breeding plumaged Horned Grebe off MER - 2 Lapland Longspurs and 5 Snow Buntings at MER - late Pine and Palm Warblers along the north shore of Amherst Island and a late American Redstart in the Owl Woods - hundreds of sparrows of 11 species Please note that you must be a member of the Kingston Field Naturalists (KFN) or be accompanied by a member to access the Martin Edwards Reserve. The same holds for the Amherstview Sewage Lagoons (or obtain permission). Here are the full results from each location: - [Hwy 401 carpool lot](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280499) - [Amherst Island Ferry](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280549) - [North shore road to MER](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280629) - [Martin Edwards Reserve](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280900) - [South shore road between MER and Owl Woods](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280939) - [South shore road between Owl Woods and ferry dock](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20280964) - [Ferry](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20281101) - [Amherstview Sewage Lagoons](http://ebird.org/ebird/canada/view/checklist?subID=S20281156) Thanks to everyone on the trip who helped spot birds and made for a fun day out.

4 May 2008 Prince Edward Point

Leader: Terry Sprague.

Thirteen OFO members from Toronto, Picton, Kingston, Napanee and Stratford birded Prince Edward Point today and found 78 species. Temperature was 10 degrees with partly cloudy skies and strong winds by early afternoon. Ten species of warblers were checked off, but missing were some obvious ones such as yellows. We did, however, manage to find Prairie, Blue‐winged, Northern Parula, Blackburnian, Nashville, and Palm Warblers, among the more notable ones, as well as a Yellow‐throated Vireo. Both White‐winged and Surf Scoters were present in Prince Edward Bay among the nine species of waterfowl spotted. A persistent Wilson’s snipe winnowed non‐stop all day and a flock of about 30 Rusty Blackbirds was present in the Point Traverse area for much of the day. One of the more unusual finds was a rather displaced Marsh Wren who chattered deep within a tangle of deciduous shrubs near the banding area, a long way from the nearest cattail marsh. A Bald Eagle floated lazily over us during lunch, and both Cooper’s and Sharp‐shinned Hawks were found, as well as a Broad‐winged Hawk. Despite the unsuitable habitat, several Bobolinks entertained us upon our arrival with their rollicking song. Both Hermit Thrush and Wood Thrush were seen. Baltimore Orioles were present, lots of White‐throated Sparrows, and a few White‐Crowned Sparrows, and a small flock of Purple Finches at the banding station.

Early buttercup, early saxifrage, spring beauties, fragrant sumac and Dutchman’s breeches were all in bloom. The bane of Prince Edward Point, dog strangling vine, was just beginning to peek through the ground, a plant so insidious and aggressive that it has caused garlic mustard to become something of a rarity.

Reported by Terry Sprague.

13 May 2007 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Leader: Terry Sprague.

Seventeen birders joined Terry Sprague today at the south‐east tip of Prince Edward County for a tour of the Price Edward Point Wildlife Area.

A total of 79 species including 17 warbler species were seen.

Highlights included excellent views of Cape May Warblers and Northern Parula Warblers. Blue‐gray Gnatcatchers were much in evidence including a pair tending a nest at eye level close to the road. Birders had an opportunity to compare Red‐shouldered Hawk and Red‐tailed Hawks which were circling together overhead.

An additional highlight was a visit to the banding station to see the banding activity.

OFO thanks Terry Sprague for once again leading an excellent trip.

Reported by Chester Gryski.

14 May 2006 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Eight OFO members and friends were not daunted by the weather forecast that called for rain and joined Terry Sprague at 7:00 a.m. at the Prince Edward Point Wildlife Area. 78 species were observed. The highlights included a very co‐operative Clay‐colored Sparrow, a less co‐operative Mourning Warbler, and also Northern Parula, Wilson’s Warbler, Bay‐breasted Warbler, Cape May Warbler, Wild Turkey, Green Heron, White‐winged Scoter, Wilson’s Snipe, Sharp‐shinned Hawk, Blue‐headed Vireo, Warbling Vireo, Philadelphia Vireo and Scarlet Tanager. Participants also had an opportunity to view the banding activities at the Prince Edward Point Bird Observatory (PEPtBo).

Reported by Chester Gryski and Terry Sprague.

15 May 2005 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Leader: Terry Sprague.

Sunny skies and a cacophony of bird song greeted the dozen or so OF members from Toronto, Ottawa, Kingston, and places in between, as they met at Prince Edward Point on May 15th to sample some spring birding at this remote corner of Prince Edward County. Quickly becoming known as the "Point Pelee of eastern Lake Ontario," Prince Edward Point has recorded well over 300 of the County's checklist of 340 confirmed species.

This south-eastern tip of Prince Edward County harbours phenomenal numbers of songbird migrants in May, and weather conditions were ideal for a successful day of birding. A light all night rain had brought in good numbers of migrants, and a visit to the Point Traverse Woods within the Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area found trees and bushes seething with warblers. Northern Parulas were common enough that we soon lost interest in them after the first 30 minutes, and at least a half dozen Golden-winged Warblers were also found, among the 20 species of warblers ticked off on the day's checklist. Vireos included Blue-headed, Warbling and Red-eyed.

At the Prince Edward Point Lighthouse woods, Orchard orioles cavorted in the black willows with Baltimore Orioles and a Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher was also seen. A Yellow-billed Cuckoo was also present in the same area. The small colony of Clay-colored Sparrows were thoughtfully singing in their usual nesting area behind the banding station and all members had good looks at several individuals as they flew from one red cedar to another. Another single bird, discovered only two days earlier, was also singing in an open field west of the harbour, suggesting another colony starting up.

Other notable finds included Common Loon, Long-tailed Ducks (which left the area five days later), Pileated Woodpecker, Great Crested Flycatcher, Common Raven (a regularly encountered resident individual), Hermit and Wood Thrush, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Indigo Bunting.

As Osprey passing over the Point Traverse Woods, and a Merlin that posed obligingly at the top of an ash tree, rounded out a perfect day of birding for the members. Ninety-eight species were recorded by the group. Reported by Terry Sprague www.naturestuff.net By the end of the day, the group had recorded 39 species.

Reported by John Miles

16 May 2004 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Leader: Terry Sprague.

Approximately 15 OFO members turned up for our annual field trip to Prince Edward Point on Sunday, 16 May, under the leadership of Terry Sprague. The trip coincided with Bird Migration Awareness Week, an annual event held every year during this week to draw attention to the excellent birding opportunities at this south-eastern most tip of Prince Edward County.

The spring migration was in full swing and close to 30 species of warblers were present that weekend. Some 60 pairs of Cliff Swallows were nesting at the lighthouse and members also had a look at a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher's nest. Clay-colored Sparrows were in their traditional breeding area in the field behind the Bird Observatory at the tip, and there were still close to 100 Long-tailed Ducks out on Prince Edward Bay. Among the more interesting bird species seen during the day included Scarlet Tanager, Orchard Orioles, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Blackpoll Warblers, Bay-breasted Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Philadelphia Vireo, and Black-billed Cuckoo. Approximately 80 species of birds were recorded during the day. Next spring's OFO trip for Prince Edward Point is scheduled for Sunday, 15 May.

Reported by Terry Sprague

17 May 2003 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Leader: Terry Sprague.

This trip, which has become an annual event now, was attended by 15 OFO members from Picton, Guelph, Warkworth, Campbellford, Brighton, Collingwood, Brooklin and Toronto. The trip tied in with Bird Migration Awareness Week, held each year to draw attention to the fine birding opportunities to be found at Prince Edward Point and surrounding area. However, migration during the week leading up to the OFO trip lacked the spectacular waves and fallouts that have made Prince Edward Point famous. Migration was steady, with all species typical for the season present, but pickings were particularly poor on 17 May. Members combed the entire Prince Edward Point/Point Traverse area as well as the wooded swamp two fields west of the lighthouse, coming up with a respectable count including Gadwall, Blue-headed Vireo, Wood Thrush, Brown Thrasher, Tennessee Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Clay-Colored Sparrows, and Indigo Bunting, along with other species normal for this time of year.

Reported by Terry Sprague

18 May 2002 Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area

Leader: Terry Sprague.

Meet at 7 a.m. at the bird sightings board at the Ducks Dive Cottages & Charters, just outside the entrance to Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area. From Picton, take County Road 10 (Lake Street at the LCBO) for 8 km to Cherry Valley, then left at the stop sign and follow for 6 km to Milford. At the post office, turn right and follow County Road 10 to the Mariner's Museum at South Bay. Turn right and follow County Road 13 for 17 km to Prince Edward Point. Spring migrants.

19 May 2001 Prince Edward Point

Led by Terry Sprague.

A total of 11 birders from Picton, Toronto, Peterborough, Warkworth, Campbellford and Alexandria turned up for the OFO birding trip to Prince Edward Point. The trip fell on the tail end of a very successful birding festival week in which close to 170 species of birds had been seen in Prince Edward County, most of them at Prince Edward Point. Approximately 80 species of birds were checked off on the OFO trip and we were in time to see some of the later migrants such as Mourning Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Wilson's Warbler and Willow Flycatcher, but not so late as to miss any of the earlier migrants. Warbler and vireo activity in the Point Traverse woods was good and among the better finds were Philadelphia Vireo, several Tennessee Warblers (singing), Ovenbird, and a large migrating pocket of Bay-breasted Warblers and Chestnut-sided Warblers which seemed to descend on us at one point, then move off.

There was an abundance of birds including Sharp-shinned Hawk, Osprey, nesting Cliff Swallows, and a nice variety of warblers. There were still a few Long-tailed Ducks out on Prince Edward Bay where earlier in the week, long strings numbering 35,000 had been noisily feeding. A stop along Babylon Road, west of the Prince Edward National Wildlife Area produced Clay-colored Sparrows and an Upland Sandpiper.

The Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area is 750 hectares in size and was purchased by the Canadian Wildlife Service in 1976 in recognition of its importance to bird migration. Over 300 species have been recorded there, with occasional spring concentrations and groundings that rival those found at Point Pelee.

Reported by Terry Sprague

Wilson's Plover
Photo: Bill Edmunds

Killdeer
Photo: Brandon Holden

Killdeer
Juvenile
Photo: Sandra and Frank Horvath

Black-bellied Plover
Photo: Michael Werner

Killdeer
Photo: Mark Peck

American Golden-Plover
Photo: Jean Iron

Semipalmated Plover
Photo: Daniel Cadieux

Semipalmated Plover
Photo: Mike McEvoy

American Golden-Plover
Juvenile
Photo: Latafat Correa

American Golden-Plover
Photo: Frank and Sandra Horvath